2

As a sample sentence

I realize that I have <insert phrase> for too long. I need to quit this job and take my chances.

8

7 Answers 7

3

There is a modern expression "comfort zone" so you could say "I realise I have been stuck in my comfort zone for too long".

2

To tread water is literally to swim in place moving your legs and not going anywhere. But it has a common figurative meaning: as Collins Cobuild says, "If you say that someone is treading water, you mean that they are in an unsatisfactory situation where they are not progressing, but are just continuing doing the same things."

It captures the idea of repetition, lack of progress, just trying to keep alive without doing anything better. If you're literally treading water you're probably waiting for someone to throw you a line or a flotation device, and similarly in the figurative sense you're not taking control, you're just waiting to be rescued.

You would say: "I realize that I have been treading water for too long. I need to quit this job and take my chances."

0

I realize that I've had cold feet for too long. I need to quit this job and take my chances.

cold feet (n.)

Informal
A loss or lack of courage or confidence; an onset of uncertainty or fear Collins

Cold feet is a phrase which refers to a person not going through with an action, particularly one which requires long term commitment, due to fear, uncertainty, and doubt.

Definitions (psychological)
A loss or lack of courage or confidence; an onset of uncertainty or fear
Too fearful to undertake or complete an action
Timidity that prevents the continuation of a course of action

Etymology

The origin of the term itself has been largely attributed to American author Stephen Crane, who added the phrase, in 1896, to the second edition of his short novel, Maggie: A Girl of the Streets. Crane writes, "I knew this was the way it would be. They got cold feet." The term is present in "Seed Time and Harvest" by Fritz Reuter published in 1862. Kenneth McKenzie, a former professor of Italian at Princeton University attributed the first use of the phrase to the play Volpone produced by Ben Jonson in 1605. The true origin and first usage of the phrase remains debated and unconfirmed as exemplified above. Wiki

Likewise, my knowledge of the concept of approach-avoidance conflicts helped me to recognize that the frightening aspects of my dream...was a normal expression of my cold feet about getting "married," so to speak, to a new job. ref.

What if I'm about to take the offer—but am getting cold feet? Let's fully acknowledge those nerves, and put them into context. ref.

0

You can say

I realize that I have been faint hearted for too long. I need to quit this job and take my chances.

Lexico gives

faint heart
NOUN

A person who lacks courage or conviction.

First-class professionals prospered in that hostile environment, while faint hearts fell by the wayside.

Lexico also gives the proverb

faint heart never won fair lady

Timidity will prevent you from achieving your objective.

0

Stagnating too long , not growing , remained complacent, unable to thrive

PS : it looks like inability to thrive in a position might be a reflection of self rather than the position

0

StuartF and Canadian_Yankee gave great answers that resonate with me.

Some other ideas coming to my mind:

  • "stuck in a rut"
  • "stuck with tunnel vision"
  • "resting on my laurels"
  • "resting and vesting"

There is also the related notion of a "dead-end job".

0

"stuck in a rut" -- because you have no progression you can make if you are stuck in a hole in the ground

I realize that I have been stuck in a rut for too long. I need to quit this job and take my chances.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.