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Here is a simple example:

  • He told me to get out - or words to that effect.

Now I'm familiar with the usage of the expression "to this/that effect". I wanted to ask what would be a formal way to use the expression after a sentence that describes the text we're referring to. For example, here is a sentence:

  • Legislation to that effect created fierce controversy both in Parliament and outside.

Now in formal writing, what would be a sentence preceding this one which would contain the text, the that (in above sentence) is referring to?

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    What do you mean by formal, exactly? We can't really invent that sentence for you, but if you include yours, we could address a specific concern.
    – livresque
    Aug 18 at 22:06
  • @livresque By formal, what I meant was a sentence that is grammatically coherent. Aug 19 at 13:02
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A preceding sentence would be something like:

They decided that people committing serious offences should be extradited. Legislation to that effect created fierce controversy both in Parliament and outside.

This means that the enacted legislation — that effectively said that people should be extradited — created fierce controversy.

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  • Thank you for expounding! I was stuck on this. I'm expanding my knowledge of English these days. I'm learning phrases, idioms, collocations etc. but mostly trying to transfer words from my passive vocabulary to active vocabulary. Aug 19 at 12:58

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