7

A: What do you want to eat for dinner?

B : No difference/No different.

Which is correct and why?

3
  • It certainly wouldn't be no deference! Voting to close as not constructive. Feb 6, 2012 at 16:46
  • 1
    If someone asked what you want for dinner and you say, "No deference", that would mean that you refuse to give in to someone else's dinner preference. :-)
    – Jay
    Feb 6, 2012 at 16:55
  • 2
    @Fumble: You're just not showing the proper difference to the OP. Deferent strokes for deferent folks.
    – Robusto
    Feb 6, 2012 at 17:01

3 Answers 3

9

No difference is a noun phrase, whereas no different is an adjective phrase. Compare:

This candidate's agenda is no different from that one's.

There is no difference between the agenda of the two candidates.

As regards your particular example, I agree with @Will in that "anything" would be a better response than no difference. No different would be completely wrong.

3
  • Or "no preference". Feb 6, 2012 at 17:37
  • 3
    Or "It makes no difference to me". Feb 6, 2012 at 17:41
  • thanks guys... usually i said no difference.. i mean of no difference is that " There is no difference for me to what eating" so i thought i can put it on short form look like "no difference". Anything is better, but from the grammatical point of view there is no grammatical problem in "no difference" am i right?
    – Danial
    Feb 6, 2012 at 18:07
6

Neither one is correct. You would say “It makes no difference (to me)”.

0

You may use "anything", "nothing", rather than "no difference". Please see make no difference

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