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For example: "Doing many things at the same time oggies an oggy for hazards"

What's oggy?

I could say opens an opportunity for... But open an opportunity is usually used in a positive context. Also "opens the door for...", usually for good things. What's similar but has a negative connotation, meaning when used it implies something bad would happen.

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    Sorry, I fixed the typo. To=time.
    – JJrussel
    Jun 30, 2021 at 6:10

3 Answers 3

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" asking for trouble."

To behave or act in a manner that will very likely result in trouble, difficulty, or danger

  • You shouldn't leave your children alone in the house like that or you’re asking for trouble.
  • Hey! Calm down! I know you're annoyed with your boss for making you work overtime so many times, but don't go asking for trouble!
  • Anybody who invites a complete stranger into their house is asking for trouble.
  • Those kids were just asking for trouble when they broke my house's windows.

"Courting disaster"

To court disaster means to take unnecessary risks, to follow a course of action that may bring ruin, to walk a proverbial tightrope.

"Skating on thin ice"

to do something considered quite dangerous or risky to be in a situation that can get quite dangerous or risky

  • Sebastian using all his savings to buy blue chip stocks is definitely skating on thin ice.
  • Going into a business without carrying out proper studies is like skating on thin ice.
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Open a can of worms

to create a complicated situation in which doing something to correct a problem leads to many more problems

Our boss is reluctant to change the policy now because she doesn't want to open a can of worms.

[Merriam-Webster]

Pandora's box

something that creates a lot of new problems that you did not expect: Sadly, his reforms opened up a Pandora's box of domestic problems._

[Cambridge]

Cruising for a bruising

(informal) Following a course of action likely to result in injury or other trouble for oneself.

The Euroland economy has been cruising for a bruising for a while.

[Wiktionary]

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unfortuitously

This works since it plays on being the opposite of a fortunate happenstance.

Usage:

He unfortuitously left the submarine hatch open before its maiden voyage.

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    You should include a dictionary definition for your suggestion. Jul 1, 2021 at 6:09

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