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When multiple objects share the same area, and the space between them is not equal, we call them 'dispersed', or 'scattered'. Is there one word that means 'evenly spaced objects' in English? (Does not matter if its formal or even archaic)

4 Answers 4

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Equidistant and uniform are appropriate.

If spaced-evenly appears a double-word, use evenly.

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    You should include dictionary definitions for each suggested word. Commented Jun 22, 2021 at 7:09
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There are several conceivable situations where what exactly you're trying to capture will influence what word would be most suitable, especially if you want something more colorful or evocative.

Here's a few ideas I had, roughly grouped together by "feeling":

Distributed, arrayed, incremented, incremental - which isn't necessarily evenly distributed etc, but to me this seems to elicit regularly distributed (analogous to how when you say "quality" this tends to mean good quality but technically can be used for either good or bad quality.)

More precise but still potentially evocative descriptions: latticed, tessellate, aligned, arranged, ordered, periodic, oscillation/oscillating, incremental, columned, linearized, rectified. Also various statistical terms: regularized, parmaterized, normalzied, etc.

If you want to comment on the dimensionality of regularity, that can elicit more colorful or poetic word choices. In addition to some of the examples above, here are others: checkered, dotted, striped, matrix, bricked.

PS - homogenized!

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In mathematics, a sequence of evenly-spaced numbers is called arithmetic (used as an adjective; see Wikipedia).

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I use "justified" for evenly filled space

Source: https://www.lexico.com/definition/justified

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    This refers only to 1-D arrays, and only to typography. Commented Jun 22, 2021 at 14:09
  • That's a very good one, but only in the context of printing.
    – Adam
    Commented Jun 23, 2021 at 22:11

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