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I often see sentences like this from non-native speakers:

?It is not possible anymore to cross the border without a passport.

To me, this sounds wrong, and I would write this instead:

It is no longer possible to cross the border without a passport.

Or this, which I think is grammatically correct but stylistically bad because it's hard to figure out what “anymore” attaches to:

It is not possible to cross the border without a passport anymore.

(Here “anymore” might be spelled “any more” in some variants of English. The spelling is out of scope of my question.)

On the other hand, I think the following sentences are equally idiomatic:

Crossing the border without a passport is not possible anymore.

Crossing the border without a passport is not possible any longer.

Crossing the border without a passport is no longer possible.

An Ngrams comparison shows that “no longer possible to” is the only common variant, but there are a few hits for the other variants which are not false positives.

I think there's a rule that “anymore” (when it's part of the construction “not … anymore” meaning “no longer”) must be at the end of the sentence. Is this an actual grammatical rule? Is “not possible anymore to …” something only non-natives say, something that uneducated native speakers say but educated native speakers consider incorrect, or something rare but idiomatic (perhaps only in certain variants of English)?

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    All your examples are perfectly natural and correct. No native English speaker would find fault with any of them. Commented Jun 7, 2021 at 14:21
  • @RonaldSole Why do you figure there's such a difference in usage frequency then? Commented Jun 7, 2021 at 15:11
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    Expressions, idioms and constructions go in and out of fashion. If you compare similar expressions on Googe's Ngram viewer, you will see how the lines on the graph cross. And there are inevitably regional and cultural differences. That's life. Commented Jun 7, 2021 at 16:04
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    The important part is that any( )more hasta be in the scope of whatever negative is licensing it. Where it goes in the sentence is irrelevant. End is quite convenient, therefore common, but not required by grammar. Commented Aug 21, 2023 at 0:51

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Q. I think there's a rule that “anymore” (when it's part of the construction “not … anymore” meaning “no longer”) must be at the end of the sentence.


No longer often comes in the normal mid position for adverbs (between the subject and main verb, or after the modal verb or first auxiliary verb, or after be as a main verb), especially in more formal styles:

She no longer works here.

She doesn’t work here any longer.


However Anymore does seem to appear more commonly at the end of a phrase but this is because of the meaning of Anymore.

Any more and anymore have related meanings, but they’re not interchangeable. Whether you make anymore one word or two depends on how you’re using it. Any more refers to quantities (Would you like any more tea?). Anymore is an adverb that refers to time (I don’t like tea anymore.). Ref Grammarly

I don't want to talk about it anymore - let's drop the subject.

You don't have to pretend anymore - you're among friends now.

Nobody wants this type of heater anymore - I can't even give it away!

The old hospital isn't used anymore.

She used to love cats but one attacked her and she doesn't like them anymore.


Examples from MERRIAM-WEBSTER however show the use during a sentence as well at the end.

Your pain tolerance isn’t high anymore because the drugs kill your senses.

That group, which, in some cases, isn’t so young anymore, along with the veteran experience sprinkled in, looks to one day get over the hump of the perennially contending big brother up I-75 in Tampa Bay.

Ref MERRIAM-WEBSTER


In certain dialects, some speakers use anymore as a synonym of nowadays.

Cookies are almost impossible to come by around here anymore .

However, this usage is not considered acceptable in formal writing. In fact, it’s a fairly rare usage, so you may want to remove it from your writing altogether unless you’re writing for a very specific audience.


So I would conclude that there is no rule written or unspoken rule present in common usage "that anymore must be at the end of the sentence.*

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  • Thanks but the only part of this answer that's relevant to my question is “However Anymore does only seem to appear at the end of a phrase but this is because of the meaning of Anymore.” and this doesn't explain anything. It certainly doesn't explain placement: now could go at the beginning of the sentence, anymore definitely can't. Commented Jun 14, 2021 at 9:41
  • @Gilles 'SO- stop being evil' You are incorrect in your statement. If you apply my conditional "now cannot be interchanged with anymore". THEN "NOW" COULD ONLY BE PLACED AT THE END..
    – Brad
    Commented Jun 14, 2021 at 9:54
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    Which is exactly why your statement is wrong: “Now, it is not possible to cross the border without a passport” is a valid sentence, but “*Anymore it is not possible to cross the border without a passport” isn't. Commented Jun 14, 2021 at 9:56
  • anymore means any longer: It is not possible any longer to cross the border without your clothes. It is not possible anymore to cross the border without your clothes. [careful, there is a trick there.] Neither go at the end. They have to come after possible. No, not at the end of the sentence. Brad is right about that. I really don't get people and their dvs.
    – Lambie
    Commented Jun 14, 2021 at 19:41
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It’s “Any more”. So please don’t write “anymore” any more as it’s not English according to a lifetime’s experience (and my Chambers dictionary). As for its placement, that’s a matter of style and emphasis. And anyone who “thinks there’s a rule” must be learning English and should perhaps be posting on English language learners.

Footnote

My favourite example of the usage of “any more” is from the field of social medicine:

“Don’t have any more Mrs Moore”.

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    As much as I would like to agree with you. Once again our cousins are dictating the English Language. Anymore seems to be in common use in the U.S. and it does appear in the Cambridge English Dictionary. On our side Grammarly does tells us that any more and anymore have different meanings. That anymore should not be used formally . It also puts a nice red line under it when you are typing and suggests you change it. –
    – Brad
    Commented Jun 15, 2021 at 0:38
  • How you spell it is irrelevant. It's a fixed phrase and functionally one word. Commented Nov 11, 2021 at 21:18
  • @JohnLawler Lateattheparty I think.
    – David
    Commented Nov 11, 2021 at 21:21
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    @Steve 'Any more' has to do with time. I'll hedge that (though you didn't hedge) as it's only a partial truth. From Lexico: << any more [adverb] (mainly North American: anymore) (usually with negative or in questions) ● To any further extent; any longer. ▪ ‘she refused to listen any more’ >> 'Any more' is still far more common in the UK than the closed compound, even for the temporal usage. Neither is incorrect. Commented Mar 12, 2022 at 16:17
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    @EdwinAshworth — Time. Time to admit that the pandemic was getting to me, and I was using SE more as a platform for humorous (don’t ever try it on the internet) wordplay from times gone by. However I can live with the two downvotes, as I’m rather fond of the answer. (He only does it to annoy…)
    – David
    Commented Mar 12, 2022 at 19:17

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