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I know that one puts a comma before a coordinating conjunction when there are two independent clauses. However, in the following sentence, when the phrase in non-essential, would one put a comma afterward?

Ex.) She told him that the money was gone, and, therefore, he could not retrieve it.

This feels like it obliges to all comma rules, but it looks very awkward.

Or in the following case:

Ex.) She told him that the money was gone and, therefore, could not be retrieved.

Once again, I've heard about commas coming before "and," but not really after.

But now, could it be:

Ex.) She told him that the money was gone, and therefore, he could not retrieve it.

This is the form I use, as I just figure the the use of a coordinating conduction suggests a new clause, and therefore, it does not need a comma.

Or do all of these work, and it's just one of those comma things?

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  • Try saying out loud all the three versions, and see which one sounds the best. There are no hard-and-fast rules of punctuation.
    – user405662
    Jun 10 '21 at 4:45
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    I would naturally use only a single comma, and I would put it after "gone".
    – Peter
    Jun 10 '21 at 5:14

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