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I know that I can use the phrase 'on the condition that' with if clauses such as

  • He agreed to work on Saturdays on condition that he was paid overtime.

But I'm not sure if I can use this structure like,

  • I would recommend it to all ages on the condition that they’ve watched the other two films of the series.

I've used the word 'would' in the main clause but in the if clause I've used a present perfect tense. Would that be a correct usage? I also wonder whether I should use 'on the condition that' or 'on condition that. I'd be grateful if you could answer those questions above.

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    It's a heavy-duty, ponderous phrase. Possibly justified in your first example, but sounding a pedantic replacement for 'if' in the second. Commented Jun 7, 2021 at 18:18
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    'On the condition that' sounds so formal that one wonders if there will be a stiff penalty for watching the films in the wrong order. Better avoided. Commented Jun 7, 2021 at 18:31
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    I would recommend it to anyone if they have already watched the other two films in the series. Commented Jun 7, 2021 at 19:11
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    In a negotiation, you might ask for X on the condition that Y. You would not recommend X on the condition that Y unless you're making a deal, and someone owes you Y. On the condition that describes a requirement, not a suggestion. That's why it does fit a film suggestion. Commented Jun 7, 2021 at 19:56
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    Then there’s provided that and given that.
    – Xanne
    Commented Oct 26, 2023 at 6:33

2 Answers 2

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Despite the word "condition" this is not a conditional sentence, in case you're wondering if it should have used the past perfect, as in "I would recommend it if I had enjoyed it." This "would" is the "polite request" version and is not needed grammatically. "On the condition that" is a bit wordy and could be replaced by "if."

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Your sentence is grammatical, but "on the condition that" is not in the proper register for your sentence and the present perfect is overkill. Here's an exaggerated example of what I mean:

You can have ice cream for dessert but only on condition that you have finished your peas.

A simple "only if" would do and the present perfect is unnecessary:

You can have ice cream for dessert but only if you finish your peas.

Also, what does having seen the first two films of the series have to do with the film's suitability for all ages?

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