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I've been confused by the usage of "from the standpoint of" and "in terms of". Could anyone tell me if both of the following sentences are correct? 

In terms of a high standard living, the US and the UK are leaders in the world.

From the standpoint of high standard living, the US and the UK are leaders in the world.

It would be highly appreciated if you could explain those two phrases with some examples. Thanks in advance.

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"From the standpoint of" means "Looked at from a certain place". That is not the same as "in terms of" which defines the terms being considered.

The sentence you are probably looking for is:

In terms of living standards the US and the UK are leaders in the world.

It means That when we consider (only) living standards the US and UK are leaders. There is no need to add "high" unless someone might think the US and UK are somehow "leaders" in low living standards.

You would use "From the standpoint of" when specifying a person or similar.

From the standpoint of a housing investor the US is the best opportunity.

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  • Thanks for your kind explanation. Can I say "from an economic standpoint" or "from the standpoint of economy"? though they are not specifying a person.
    – allenwang
    Jun 6 at 1:53
  • Could you please also help me check if the following sentences are correct? In terms of economy, the recovery is gaining momentum in the world. From the standpoint of economy, vaccination the best way to end Covid.
    – allenwang
    Jun 6 at 2:17
  • Disagree. Both "in terms of" and "from the standpoint of" are used today in such a way that either would be appropriate at the beginning of the sentence. The definition you give - "looked at from a certain place" - indeed supports the choice of "from the standpoint of."
    – cruthers
    Jul 5 at 5:20

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