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The decision to become part contract manufacturer rather than designing chips and outsourcing production, which rivals such as AMD have done successfully, requires a huge outlay that investors may find hard to stomach.

In details,I was considering whether the "rivals" is a verb or a noun or what is the attribute of this clause.

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    In that clause, "rivals" is a noun. I don't know enough about the subjectmatter to tell you if it's saying that "becoming part contract manufacturer rather than designing chips and outsourcing production" is what "rivals such as AMD have done successfully" or saying that "designing chips and outsourcing production" is what "rivals such as AMD have done successfully. It's ambiguous, an ambiguity that likely wouldn't be ambiguous at all to anyone knowledgeable about the subjectmatter. – Benjamin Harman May 4 at 5:22
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    @user405662 - If "which" referred back to "the decision" as its antecedent, the verb in the relative clause would be "have made," not "have done." A decision is "made," not "done." Since this is a quote from an article by Brett Ryder in the extremely heady magazine The Economist, there's zero possibility that it's an error from broken English or from the author using the wrong verb and The Economist's horde of editors all missing it. Never mind that if "which" referred back to "the decision," the clause (i.e., the decision rivals such as AMD have done successfully) wouldn't make sense. – Benjamin Harman May 4 at 5:42
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    @Benjamin Harrison: Ah, how could I overlook that! You are right. – user405662 May 4 at 5:47
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    @user405662 - Thanks for the up-arrow, but know that I am not the 23rd President of the United States, as evidenced by the fact that I'm not dead, so don't call me Benjamin Harrison. ;) – Benjamin Harman May 4 at 5:51
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    It's clearly a noun. It's head of the NP that controls the verb phrase "have done successfully". – BillJ May 4 at 6:24