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I get stuck about using a vert after an object. More specifically, can I use 'rises' instead of 'rising' in the following sentence: "There are 130 of them altogether, each one 'rising' between 20 and 25 meters from the ground to support a frame of iron bars on which the roof originally rested". If it's accepted, please anyone can help me explain the difference when using it. And what are the contexts we should use the verb + ing like about sentences? Thanks in advance.

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  • As is so often the case with this sort of question it depends on the context. What you have provided is not sentence because it does not start with a capital letter so there must be more words, and probably punctuation, in front of it. Give us the entire sentence and we may be able to answer your question.
    – BoldBen
    Apr 16 '21 at 0:27
  • Hi BoldBen, I just adjusted my question
    – Myn13
    Apr 16 '21 at 0:30
  • Thanks, I think we must have overlapped, the edit didn't show while I was making that comment.
    – BoldBen
    Apr 16 '21 at 0:34
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The difference between the rising version and the rises version is that the first is untensed and the second is tensed. In other words, the first one can't stand as a complete sentence by itself, while the second can. The shortest English sentence Go is possible only because it is tensed (the subject of the sentence being implied in this case.)

EDIT

I can see that the OP has modified the question a good deal. Consequently, the answer needs to be modified as well. But since the logic is still the same as I've outlined earlier, I hope the OP is able to see for themselves why their changed version reads like a complete sentence.

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  • Actually, I still get confused about it. Is it a reduced relative clause or other points?. Or we just need to remember that after a main sentence, we should use a verb + ing like that?
    – Myn13
    Apr 16 '21 at 0:44
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    Follow the grammar point that you mentioned. I found it in the Cambridge dictionary. "dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/…". Now I can get it, thanks so much for your help:)))))
    – Myn13
    Apr 16 '21 at 0:56
  • @Myn13: Yes, you're on the right track. Glad my answer helped. :)
    – user405662
    Apr 16 '21 at 0:59
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"each one rising between 20 and 25 meters from the ground to support a frame of iron bars on which the roof originally rested" is not a sentence. You cannot find the subject and verb.

"Each one rises between 20 and 25 meters from the ground to support a frame of iron bars on which the roof originally rested." is a sentence.

There are many pillars, each one rising between 20 and 25 meters from the ground to support a frame of iron bars on which the roof originally rested." is a sentence.


added

There are 130 of them altogether, each one rising between 20 and 25 meters from the ground to support a frame of iron bars on which the roof originally rested.

is a sentence.

With "rises" perhaps use a semicolon, since there are two separate clauses.

There are 130 of them altogether; each one rises between 20 and 25 meters from the ground to support a frame of iron bars on which the roof originally rested.

Maybe better, two sentences.

There are 130 of them altogether. Each one rises between 20 and 25 meters from the ground to support a frame of iron bars on which the roof originally rested.

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  • Thanks for your help, but as you mentioned in the third sentence, why we use 'rising' instead of 'rises'. I'm wondering that is it a reduced relative clause?
    – Myn13
    Apr 16 '21 at 0:21

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