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The sale of goods directly to the consumer, encompassing the storefronts, mail-order, websites, etc., and the corporate mechanisms, branding, advertising, etc. that support them.

Retail price; full price; an abbreviated expression, meaning the full suggested price of a particular good or service, before any sale, discount, or other deal.

Source: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/retail#English

The way I hear it recently is like:

Institutions buy Bitcoin all the time. Retail don't have much say.

Here, they seem to refer to "retail" as being "the common man", or individuals, rather than having anything to do with a "retail store" or "full price".

Why do they call "non-institutions" retail?

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    Selectively highlighting the Wiktionary definition: 'retail (uncountable) (business) The sale of goods directly to the consumer, encompassing the storefronts, mail-order, websites, etc, and the corporate mechanisms, branding, advertising, etc that support them.' M-W simplifies this part to 'the industry of such selling', where 'industry' means the people/companies involved together with the infrastructure, not 'gainful toil'. Apr 15 '21 at 11:17
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Retail in the last sentence refers to “retail market” which in finance refers to non professional companies or individuals.

Retail market:

  1. The market for the sale of securities to individual investors rather than institutional investors or broker-dealers

(Farlex Financial Dictionary)

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