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I want to find a single word or perhaps an academic-sounding phrase to refer to the effect on something that results from the calendar year changing. I initially tried: "year begin effect" but this kind of sounds too caveman-ish.

One example sentence to frame the usage:

The ______ effect was very noticeable this year, with sales growth across multiple product categories.

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  • What's wrong with New Year effect?
    – BoldBen
    Commented Apr 6, 2021 at 3:56
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    Related, maybe: The formal (but not-very-formal-sounding) term fresh-start effect. Commented Apr 6, 2021 at 4:06
  • @TinfoilHat Hmm, ninja'ed by a minute :p Yeah, it's not exactly the same thing, but I think it's reasonably close.
    – cigien
    Commented Apr 6, 2021 at 4:11

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A recent study used the term Fresh Start Effect to describe changes in motivation caused by a temporal landmark, such as a new year, or even a new month, or a new week.

It's not too much of a stretch to use it in the context you want, which is to describe the general effect on something arising from a new calendar year

The Fresh Start Effect was very noticeable this year, with sales growth across multiple product categories.

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