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I came across two different videos in which the suffix -ment was being pronounced in a way that the N sound was completely reduced and the T sound was a stop T.

The words were bewilderment and alignment, and both speakers were from the U.S. Having the N sound reduced like that made it really hard to understand those words.

I had never noticed this before. Is this a specific type of accent or is it something more common?

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    Can you give some more context? What is their general accent? UK/US/Aust? Is it natural conversation, a news broadcast, or fiction? A link to the video would help. As described and with no context at all it just sounds like that one person is weird. Or it could be a natural part of a particular accent that I've never noticed. – Mitch Mar 17 at 15:21
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    In an unstressed suffix, nasal sounds like /n/ are frequently reduced to nasality on the vowels. Native speakers hear the /n/; non-native speakers don't, because they don't recognize nasality, especially in a reduced unstressed final syllable. – John Lawler Mar 17 at 15:34
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In an unstressed suffix, nasal sounds like /n/ are frequently reduced to nasality on the vowels. Native speakers hear the /n/; non-native speakers don't, because they don't recognize nasality, especially in a reduced unstressed final syllable. – John Lawler

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