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I'm unsure which would be the best way to write the following example sentence:

  1. You asked me to call you today about X.

  2. You asked me to call you about X today.

2
  • They're very similar, but why is today needed? There's always the possibility that the receiver reads it as fighting a paper tiger, turning their words back on them. "So I said call today, what of it?" – Yosef Baskin Mar 5 at 17:07
  • They're both ambiguous. The first sounds less natural. – Edwin Ashworth Mar 5 at 19:25
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This is not merely a matter of opinion. It also may depend on the detail of X.

”X today” may be a meaningful noun phrase.

First example:

You asked me to call you today about the First World War.

You asked me to call you about the First World War today.

In both these cases the nature of X (an event completely in the past, unless the call perhaps relates to an unstated thing such as today’s historical research on the war) is such that the discussion will be about X as it was, not as it is today. It will be a general discussion, not peculiar to today.

Second example:

You asked me to call you today about the price of tomatoes.

The discussion may be about the generality of tomato price (in relation to demand, supply, weather etc) or it may be about today’s tomato prices.

You asked me to call you about the price of tomatoes today.

The discussion is likely to be about today’s tomato prices.

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