0

I have found both on the Internet. Which one is correct? If both are, what's the difference between the two?

11
  • You should include the examples that you found on the Internet for context. Either could be the correct choice depending on what the sentence is trying to convey. Feb 5, 2021 at 9:15
  • 2
    Just waiting - talks about waiting; ...just for - talks about the reason. In other words, what immediately follows 'just' gets the influence of it.
    – Ram Pillai
    Feb 5, 2021 at 9:23
  • 1
    Often, we say "I am just waiting for something" to mean that is all I am doing, and not anything else, whereas "I am waiting just for something" generally means I am waiting only for that thing. Feb 5, 2021 at 9:44
  • 1
    1. A policeman asks me why I am standing around. I can say "I'm just waiting for a bus" (and not e.g. loitering with intent to rob). 2. At a party someone says "I hope plenty of people come", and I might say "I'm waiting just for Mary to arrive" (I don't care who else comes). Feb 5, 2021 at 9:47
  • 2
    "I am just waiting for Mary" is often used with the sense "I am waiting for Mary and nobody else" too. And, confusingly, with the implication "I'm waiting for Mary; don't worry about me getting cold or anything ... I'll be along/going home soon." // Context and intonation are very important when decoding how these limiting modifiers (even, just, only, merely, almost, hardly, simply, alone, also ...) are being used. Feb 8, 2021 at 17:18

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.