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This is the headline: US President Biden discovers limits to his power in dash to erase Trump's legacy

What is the meaning of "in dash" here?

Something that is readily available, like in a dashboard?

Just short for "in a dash" i.e. "quickly"?

Something else?

The story: https://english.alarabiya.net/News/world/2021/01/31/US-President-Biden-discovers-limits-to-his-power-in-dash-to-erase-Trump-s-legacy

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    Words are often omitted in headline writing and in this case 'his' or possibly 'the' has been omitted between 'in' and 'dash'. The full version would be "...limits to his power in his dash to erase...". "Dash" here is a close synonym for "hurry" or "rush". Does that make it clearer?
    – BoldBen
    Feb 1, 2021 at 6:51
  • @Boldben Spot on. That surely should be an answer rather than a comment.
    – Anton
    Feb 1, 2021 at 7:49
  • @BoldBen can you repost your comment as an answer so I can accept it? Thanks Feb 1, 2021 at 10:32

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Upgrading my comment to an answer as requested. No supporting references I'm afraid.

Words are often omitted in headline writing and in this case 'his' or possibly 'the' has been omitted between 'in' and 'dash'. The full version would be "...limits to his power in his dash to erase...". "Dash" here is a close synonym for "hurry" or "rush". Does that make it clearer? 

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It's a nightmare of headline-ese.

"US President Biden discovers limits to his power in dash to erase Trump's legacy" is appallingly difficult to parse.

It means:

"US President Biden discovers (some) limits to his power in (his) dash to erase Trump's legacy."

In this context, "dash" means "actions made in haste"

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  • Definitely bad headlinese or journalese. It's common to see words like "rush", "race", "dash" in headlines, almost always designed to promote a sense of urgency and excitement in the reader, rather than to communicate anything important or urgent in the real world.
    – Stuart F
    Feb 1, 2021 at 14:29
  • @StuartF An excellent point that I should have raised myself. Feb 1, 2021 at 17:17

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