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In a business email, I found this expression. I wonder how I can make a full sentence from this expression: "Further actions to come out of this discussion." What I'm guessing is: "Further actions will come out of this discussion". If I'm not wrong, how can this short form be applied? Is it possible to use "noun to verb" instead of "noun will verb" always?

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  • Not exactly. The infinitive to come, like "What's to come" or "What's to become" points to the future. Many languages base future tense on the infinitive. Standard business TBD means something will be decided. (Okay, it's deliberately vague.) Jan 19 at 23:40
  • So, my interpretation is correct but this rule is not always correct. right? maybe because the infinitive form can be interpreted in many different ways.
    – Daebarkee
    Jan 19 at 23:54
  • Yes. In business, "actions to come out" implies they will, but does not promise it! Jan 20 at 0:02
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The meaning depends on ellipsis that must be determined from context. Here are some examples of the slightly different shades of meaning that may be intended.

Further actions {are expected} to come out of this discussion.

Further actions {are planned} to come out of this discussion.

Further actions {will} come out of this discussion.

Further actions {should} come out of this discussion.

Ellipsis = a situation in which words are left out of a sentence but the sentence can still be understood

Cambridge dictionary

In many cases, ellipsis introduces a note of uncertainty that may sometimes be resolved from the wider context.

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  • Thank you for the explanation. Much clearer now.
    – Daebarkee
    Jan 21 at 19:33
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In order to close this question, I'd like to add @Yosef Baskin's answer here: Yes. In business, "actions to come out" implies they will, but does not promise it!

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