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I would need a transitive verb which would have "road" or "way" or "path" as the direct object. I want to say that a person walks this road to the end in this context:

This will give them the support and motivation to ______ (meaning follow to the end) the path back to safety.

Does such a verb exist? If a single word is not possible, is there a more idiomatic phrase than follow/go to the end of a road?

Edit 1: I know you can say that you traverse a distance. For example, if you say that you traverse the desert, it means you go from one end to the other end. However, I find it awkward to say traverse a road to mean go all its length.

I need this verb in other contexts as well. It must mean "to go all the length of".

Edit 2: The French have the term "parcourir" which is a transitive verb and means to cover the whole distance of something. But I cannot say "cover a path" in English.

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  • reach, attain, encompass, gain ... ?
    – Anton
    Jan 18 at 18:18
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    The path of return to safety? Surely that's the path to danger walked in the opposite direction. "This will give them the support and motivation to retreat". "Keep right on to the end of the road"? youtube.com/watch?v=vbM86eiczAg Jan 18 at 18:22
  • @OldBrixtonian: That's a lot of words before "road"! But thanks, I will keep it in mind.
    – fev
    Jan 18 at 18:24
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    What's wrong with just plain follow: "This will give them the support and motivation to follow the path back to safety."
    – Jim
    Jan 18 at 21:17
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    I like @Jim's follow. Similar would be to use simply walk. These words don't necessarily imply going the full length of the path, but I'm wondering if that's really required. It feels like the "to safety" part of the sentence may already cover that requirement. Jan 20 at 11:05
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You might consider using "navigate" to illustrate completion of an intentional or necessary path to a desired destination.

This will give them the support and motivation to navigate (meaning follow to the end) the path of return to safety.

Oxford Learner's Dictionary

TFD - navigate

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You could try negotiate:

4   to move through, around, or over in a satisfactory manner:
to negotiate a difficult dance step without tripping: to negotiate sharp curves.
Source: Dictionary.com—negotiate

Like this:

This will give them the support and motivation to negotiate the path of return to safety.

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