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I'm looking for a word that can be used in several situations:

  • a moment when you cannot joke
  • a subject that you can't joke about
  • a person who doesn't understand your joke

And I wonder if there are any adjectives that represent above situation or moment or subject or person.

What I found so far is "jokeless", but it sounds like "not funny" differ from what I want. If there is an adjective, 'inhumorable', that might be it.

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  • Hi Minime, this kind of single word request is off-topic here at writing.se. But is accepted over at English Language & Usage. I've gone ahead and migrated your question for you. Good luck!
    – linksassin
    Jan 8 at 0:16
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    You are looking for one word that works as an adjective for #1 and #2 and as a noun for #3? I don't think that's possible. But sacrosanct works for #1 and #2: treated as if holy : immune from criticism or violation. This moment is sacrosanct. This subject is sacrosanct. Jan 8 at 3:37
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    A person who doesn't understand joke can usually be a teacher :)
    – Ram Pillai
    Jan 8 at 7:02
  • @linksassin Thank you for moving my question on proper location!
    – Minime
    Jan 8 at 16:03
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Some adjectives that come to mind are serious, grave, solemn.

"solemnity" can be useful as a noun, for example:

  • There was no room for jokes due to the solemnity of the occasion.
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The term is Serious.

In common usage if the current situation will not permit humor one might be told, "This is serious." or "This is a serious situation." Once stated the joker knows where he stands and what a reception he will get with his five minutes of Vegas. This will cover both the moment asked about and the subject. One who cannot understand a joke is called Clueless. This is a different idea since it is not that they are too serious to understand, they just don't. One may be too serious to enjoy or permit a joke but they get it even if they would rather not.

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