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I'm talking about those doors that have mechanical locks that 'click' automatically when the door is closed and need a handle/knob to be moved to open them again. I'm using this in a sentence:

He walked towards the door to check in case it hadn't clicked in.

I made 'clicked in' up. I'm not sure if there is a better word/phrase out there to replace 'clicked in'.

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    "The door snapped shut" is probably the most common wording in the US.
    – Hot Licks
    Dec 30, 2020 at 13:10
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    An automatic lock engages. Most modern cars lock soon after they’re started and the doors are closed, but not on exit. None that I know of. People would get locked out too often.
    – Xanne
    Dec 30, 2020 at 16:20
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    Despite the title, it doesn't sound like an automatic lock like on a car door; the description fits a mechanical lock like on building door that defaults to locked, such as a fire escape from the outside.
    – AlannaRose
    Dec 30, 2020 at 20:23
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    Or many dorm rooms and hotel rooms, which also default to lock as soon as you leave, whether they are automatic or mechinical. And indeed, it does leave many people locked out! That said, "engaged" could still work for a mechanical lock
    – AlannaRose
    Dec 30, 2020 at 20:29
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    Yeah sorry, I have changed the title to include mechanical instead of automatic.
    – Taimur
    Dec 30, 2020 at 20:37

2 Answers 2

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I would say that the door is "latched" if it can be opened from either side, "locked" if it can only be opened from one side without a key or code (fire codes usually specify that one must be able to exit a room unimpeded).

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He walked towards the door to check that it was shut.

(NB "shut" does not mean "locked".)

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    I think it was fully closed or completely shut better fits the original intent. The kind of door that locks behind you can look closed but the lock will not engage unless it is fully shut. This is especially true if the door has a warped frame.
    – AlannaRose
    Dec 30, 2020 at 20:27

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