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I'm looking for a strong size modifier like "numerous", "countless", or "copious" that I can use to modify a mass noun. I know of plenty of options that involve several words, like "a lot of", "a huge amount of", "large quantities of", and so on, but I can't think of any that are only a word or two.

Mass Nouns

Mass nouns, also known as uncountable nouns, are words like "rice", "water", and "bread" that can't be described with a quantity like other (countable) nouns. I ate 4 rices or I drank several waters don't really make sense, you have to use special modifiers like "some" and "much" (I baked so much bread the other day), but there are a lot fewer of these special modifiers.

The Ultimate Question

Does anyone know of one or two words that can fit in the following sentences to indicate A LOT:

I've baked ______ bread throughout my 27 years in the baker.

Wikipedia has ______ information about a myriad of topics.

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  • Considerable, copious, profuse, ample. – Hot Licks Dec 7 '20 at 14:24
  • 'Tons of', 'shedloads of', 'oodles of', 'mountains of', 'bags of', 'piles of', 'stacks of', 'bundles of' .... – Edwin Ashworth Dec 7 '20 at 15:53
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    The usual mass opposite of many is much: Not many people/Not much attendance at the service today. But they're only parallel in a negative context; much isn't used much in the affirmative: I've baked much bread is grammatical but odd. Normally another quantifier would be used, like a lot, quite a bit, some, etc. – John Lawler Dec 7 '20 at 16:21
  • If you are just looking for what is typical in conversation, "tons of" > "lots of". You can also add additional "lots" or "tons", i.e. "lots and lots and LOTS of bread!" though it can sound childish depending on usage. – mjjf Dec 7 '20 at 22:38
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I've baked masses of bread throughout my 27 years in the bakery.

Wikipedia has profuse or abundant information about a myriad of topics.

(do check the links for a wealth of synonyms :)

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The formal alternative of 'many' which can be used for mass nouns is

much,

as in

I see many dogs.

but

I see much water.

The more common and slightly informal versions works for both count and mass nouns

a lot of,

as in

I see a lot of dogs.

I see a lot of water.

There are many synonyms of these, but these are the most common.

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A few other suggestions:

considerable (Websters)

Wikipedia has considerable information about a myriad of topics.

abundant (Websters)

Wikipedia has abundant information about a myriad of topics.

tons (Webersts)

I've baked tons of bread throughout my 27 years in the baker.

extensive (Websters)

Wikipedia has extensive information about a myriad of topics.

exorbitant (Websters)

I've baked exorbitant amounts of bread throughout my 27 years in the baker.

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