0

I have a question about (Both. . .and ) and ( Not only . . . but also )

What is difference between those two? Or I can use any of them?

I like both cats and dogs.

Not only do I like cats but also dogs too.

2
  • 2
    The only difference is that in 'Not only... but also', the second item is a new idea (perhaps the previous conversation had been about cats only), or something unexpected. – Kate Bunting Nov 22 '20 at 11:03
  • The two structures could easily mean the same thing, but not here. First, we have also and too, too. Second, the sentence says that dogs like cats, because of the placement of do I like. The matching form would be I like not only cats but also dogs or Not only do I like cats but I like dogs too. – Yosef Baskin Nov 22 '20 at 13:37
0

When it comes to BOTH-AND, the verbs can't be singular, but for NOT ONLY-BUT ALSO, the verb agrees with the noun closest to it.

Examples for BOTH---AND

Both Ravi and Rani are in love with each other. --> Correct

Both Ravi and Rani love each other. --> Also correct

Both Ravi and Rani loves each other. --> Wrong

Examples for NOT ONLY---BUT ALSO

Not only Ravi but also Shiva loves Rani. --> Correct

Not only Ravi but also Shiva love Rani. --> Incorrect

Not only Ravi but also Raja and Shiva love Rani --> Correct

Not only Ravi but also Raja and Shiva loves Rani. --> Incorrect

Not only Ravi and Shiva but also Raja loves Rani. --> Correct

Not only Ravi and Shiva but also Raja love Rani. --> Incorrect

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.