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Something in that should have upset Maria, but all she could concentrate on was the pain and anguish that ravished her body. It was like a silent demon had lay dormant inside of her and fed on all the pain that had ever been inflicted on her and those she holds most dear. A demon that knew how to bide its time and unleash its festering anger on anyone that was responsible for its creation. Was the inner demon part of Maria? Or was it separate and just used the woman's body as a place to hibernate? Only Maria could answer those questions, and she was in no condition to consider them. So many emotions fed that silent demon. Emotions that Maria had thought were buried deep enough so they could not betray her at the worst possible moment.

"Emotions that Maria had thought were buried deep enough so they could not betray her at the worst possible moment."

Is Emotions the object of thought? But how do you just "think" emotions? It is ungrammatical.

Or perhaps, that Maria had thought were buried deep enough is just a relative clause modifying Emotions? But this is also ungrammatical, there's no main clause in the sentence now. Is the original sentence grammatically correct in the first place?

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    I recall you asked this kind of question before. "Emotions" is not object of "thought" but subject of the embedded were buried clause. We understand "Maria had thought that some emotions were buried deep enough ...". The whole expression in bold is a noun phrase. – BillJ Nov 11 '20 at 8:31
  • So many emotions that Maria had thought were buried deep enough so they could not betray her at the worst possible moment fed that silent demon. The whole phrase is modifying the subject of the previous sentence, but it's somehow separated by the punctuation. I don't think it's grammatically correct either, but an artistic recourse to make it more poetic. – Alberto Nov 11 '20 at 9:55
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    @Alberto The whole expression in bold is a noun phrase functioning not as a modifier but as a supplement. It is grammatically correct. – BillJ Nov 11 '20 at 12:11
  • @BillJ Thank you for the exposition of the grammatical issue mentioned. Do you mean the expression in bold from the quote is not a "sentence"? – Sam Nov 12 '20 at 17:38
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    Yes I do. It's not a sentence but a noun phrase centered around the noun "emotions". It expands the meaning of the word "emotions" in the clause that precedes it. – BillJ Nov 12 '20 at 18:29
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There is nothing wrong in that sentence. But, sometimes, rephrasing can help understand things better : Maria had thought/considered (that) her emotions were buried so sufficiently deep that they could not betray her at the worst possible moment.

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    Actually, it's not technically a sentence. – Hot Licks Nov 11 '20 at 18:51

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