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What's the difference between these two sentences? Ex1:

information requested to be confirmed

information which is/was requested to be confirmed

Please translate them into active voice Thanks

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  • The government provided/provides information for the second one. The first one isn't a complete sentence.
    – user403195
    Nov 7, 2020 at 18:12
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    The second one isn't a sentence either. Nov 7, 2020 at 19:20
  • Kindly confirm the information I requested. Another interpretation: I requested confirmation of the information. Nov 8, 2020 at 4:22

2 Answers 2

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information provided by the government

This is not a sentence, it is a noun phrase.

Information was/is provided by the government.

This is a complete sentence. It starts with a capital letter and ends with a full-stop.

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When we say 'information provided by the government' we are talking about the nature of the information not the provision of it. That is we say things like "Read the information provided by the government". In this case the phrase 'provided by the government' is an adjectival phrase modifying 'information'.

On the other hand when we say 'information was provided by the government' we are talking about the way in which the information was provided, not about the nature of the information. That is we say things like "This information was provided by the government". In this case 'by the government' is an adverbial phrase modifying 'was provided'.

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  • by the government is a prepositional phrase functioning as an adverb. Isn't it?
    – user403195
    Nov 7, 2020 at 18:36
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    @Pkjmm You're right, it is; but I had to look it up. I wasn't convinced that 'by' in "done by X' was still a preposition. However I would say the distinction between an adverbial phrase and a prepositional phrase acting as an adverb is less important than the difference I was trying to explain between the adjectival phrase and the adverbial function.
    – BoldBen
    Nov 8, 2020 at 10:39

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