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I heard you put a glottal stop[ʔ] "before" explosive sounds such as T, D, K, G, P, and B in American English. Is it true?

For example,(I used IPA for each word) class [ʔklæs], day [ʔdeɪ], ten[ʔtɛn], because[ʔbiˈʔkɔz] ※even within the word, pink[ʔpiŋk]

I can find a lot of articles or videos talking about a glottal stop when it comes at the end of word, but I can't find resources explaining inserting a glottal stop before explosive sounds.

Thank you.

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    English speakers use a glottal closure before, or simultaneously with, syllable final plosives (stops). These glottal closures are never released before the beginning of the following plosive, and because they do not count as phonemes, they are usually not glottal stops as such, but rather a feature of the following stop itself. This is normally called glottal reinforcement. So, in short, in the words that you describe, there would be no glottal stop, or glottal closure at the beginning of the word. It only happens at the end (i.e. in the coda) of a syllable. Nov 3 '20 at 2:19
  • I thought you were talking about /ʔbuːm/ and /ʔpaʊ/ in a much different way. Nov 3 '20 at 2:54
  • I don't find -any- of this to be the case in AmE, either initial or final. WHere did you hear of this phenomenon? Can you give a link?
    – Mitch
    Nov 3 '20 at 16:13
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In a comment, Araucaria wrote:

English speakers use a glottal closure before, or simultaneously with, syllable final plosives (stops). These glottal closures are never released before the beginning of the following plosive, and because they do not count as phonemes, they are usually not regarded as independent consonants as such, but rather a feature of the following stop itself. This is normally called glottal reinforcement. So, in short, in the words that you describe, there would be no glottal stop, or glottal closure at the beginning of the word. It only happens at the end (i.e. in the coda) of a syllable.

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