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I have come across many sentences having the following structure: { WITH+SUBJECT+VERB-ING } This type of sentence starts with "WITH"

For Example :

With many of the tourists returning from the site due to bad weather, we decided not to visit there.

Can anyone elaborate on this type of sentence structure?

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    'With many of the tourists returning' = 'As/Because many of the tourists were returning'. Mar 26 at 17:21
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"With" is a preposition, so starting a sentence with it is not "natural". In your example, "with many of tourist returning from the sure due to bad weather" is a prepositional phrase that acts as an adverb modifying "decided". The "natural" place to put an adverb is next to the verb it is modifying, but "with" has developed the meaning as implying causation when it precedes the verb that it modifying, so this phrase is put in front to give that meaning. When an adverbial phrase is moved to the front like this, it should be followed by a comma. Also, "many of tourist" is not grammatical. Perhaps "many a tourist" is meant. It could also be "many of the tourists". Also, I would put "to not visit" rather than "not to visit"; the latter seems to be motivated by the idea that there's something wrong with "split infinitives". Also, "due to" is here being used as an adverb, and there is a school of thought that says that it should be used as an adjective (that is, only be used to modify nouns or be the subject complement of a copula).

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    Curiously, I'm having trouble seeing how the with tourists returning bit could possibly be modifying just decided alone instead of the entire sentence the way this sentence’s sentence-adverb is doing. :)
    – tchrist
    Oct 26 '20 at 3:34
  • @tchrist It describes the conditions under which the decision was made. It's basically saying "We decided not to visit the site in response to many of tourist returning from it due to bad weather". Oct 26 '20 at 3:48
  • "Many tourists returning from the site due to bad weather, we decided not to visit there." This way, it becomes absolute construction. Am I right?
    – Ram Pillai
    Oct 26 '20 at 5:21
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    @RamPillai - That one isn’t quite grammatical. It needs a leading “Because of the” or “Due to the” or “With many of the” or a larger rewrite: “Many tourists were returning... so we decided...”
    – Jim
    Oct 26 '20 at 8:11
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    @RamPillai This is technically grammatical, as it can be read as being appositive, but it sounds awkward. Oct 26 '20 at 18:23
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With many of the tourists returning from the site due to bad weather, we decided not to visit there.

"With many of the tourists returning from the site due to bad weather" is an adverbial phrase.

The sentence does not differ grammatically from

"Quickly, we decided not to visit there."

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This is starting the sentence with a subordinate clause. It takes some doing to get that part of the sentence from the back to the front but it can be done. As you may have noticed it is not attractive. The purpose of it is to make the sentence seem more urgent. In addition, the sentence sounds as if the conversation is already underway so it can draw interest to the subject quickly; always desirable in advertising.

Wise and thoughtful recommendations against doing this as well as fixes are found here: www.dailywritingtips.com/avoid-beginning-a-sentence-with-with/

With that you don't need anymore.

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  • //with many of tourist returning from the site due to bad weather...// How is this a subordinate clause? It's a phrase, rather a participial phrase without 'with' and with it goes like "prepositional phrase [with many of the tourists] and participial phrase [returning from the site...].
    – Ram Pillai
    Mar 26 at 1:36

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