1

Someone changed a sentence in a Wikipedia article from

These cassettes became associated with genres like Gipsy rhumba, light music and joke tapes.

to

These cassettes became associated with genres such as Gipsy rhumba, light music and joke tapes.

To me it feels wrong, but I cannot pinpoint what exactly is wrong. If "genres" had an additional qualifier that would need to be expounded, like "unpretentious", or "low-brow", or "mass-market", then "such as" variant would work for me:

These cassettes became associated with unpretentious genres such as Gipsy rhumba, light music and joke tapes.

Am I not getting something here?

  • The music is like those genres, but the genres have those names. They are genre names, not names that genres might have. It is a list of example genres to which the music might belong. The edit is good. – Weather Vane Oct 25 at 20:38
  • About the adjective you would like to see. Suppose we go hiking and take fast food such as pasties, fruit and nuts. They don't need to be qualified. – Weather Vane Oct 25 at 20:58
  • Such as and like are alike in that they both mean having the same qualities as. The relevant qualities, however, need not be made explicit. 'Genres such as Gipsy rhumba' thus means genres having the same qualities as Gipsy rhumba, whatever these qualities are. – jsw29 Oct 25 at 20:58
  • @WeatherVane "Suppose we go hiking and take fast food such as pasties, fruit and nuts. They don't need to be qualified."— you put a qualifier, "fast". It works for me. Without it, "Suppose we go hiking and take food such as pasties, fruit and nuts" does not sit well with me. – Rusty Core Oct 25 at 21:51
  • 1
    Both like and such as introduce examples. It seems petty to edit someone else's draft for so small a difference. – Yosef Baskin Oct 25 at 22:02

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.