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Sentence => 'Two or more vectors are said to be equal vectors when both of their magnitudes and directions are same.'

In the above sentence I have used the word-'both' with the words- 'magnitudes' and 'directions' which are in plural form because the sentence is referring to two vectors which each have some magnitude and a direction.

Please also tell if there is an other error or if the sentence can be written in another way.

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    Each vector has one magnitude and one direction. Does 'both' refer to 'both vectors'? No, because you say "two or more." It isn't really necessary anyway: "Two or more vectors are said to be equal vectors when their magnitudes and directions are same." IMO you would have to rephrase slightly to use the word 'both': "Two or more vectors are said to be equal vectors when both their magnitude and direction are same." – Weather Vane Oct 17 at 17:12
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    I recommend a slightly different formulation: ... when both their magnitudes and their directions are the same.' Leave out the of, and add their before directions and the before same. – John Lawler Oct 17 at 17:38
  • Yes I noticed the missing 'the' too late to edit. – Weather Vane Oct 17 at 17:49
  • Two or more vectors are said to be equal when they are the same. – Hot Licks Oct 17 at 21:47
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I recommend just getting rid of the "of". Then it would make sense.

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  • Hi, and welcome to ELU. Please take the tour and consider how you might improve your answer. As it stands, this sounds like opinion. – Davo Oct 19 at 16:02

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