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Q.1 what should I choose in the following context and why ? (early vs earlier)

1- I have been doing this since early/earlier this year. 2- This occurred early/earlier this year.

Q.2 is the following context makes sense ??

They want to break us of our traditions. ( I mean they don't want us to follow our traditions anymore).

Q.3 Checking writing: which of the following is more correct, in terms of writing ?

1- it is a round seat with soft top, no back and no sides. 2- it is a round seat with soft top and with no back and no sides. 3- it is a round seat with soft top and with no back and sides.

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    I have been doing this since early this year. 2- This occurred early this year. (Here, I would prefer early to earlier. Replaced with earlier, it doesn't make any change in meaning. Early sounds more complete than earlier, because the latter may lead to ask "earlier...? earlier than what...?) 2) They want to break the traditions off us. 3) It's a round seat with soft top; no back and sides. Or, It's a round seat with soft top and no/without back and sides. – Ram Pillai Oct 13 at 5:52
  • @RamPillai - I disagree with Q1.2. They are equally valid. They mean different things. “”Early this year” means in the first months of the year” “Earlier this year” means some significant time before now but within the year. Early this this year could be Jan/Feb maybe March. But given it’s October, earlier this year could be used to refer to June or July (for example) while “early this year” could never be used so. – Jim Oct 13 at 7:02
  • @Jim: I agree with you, and I too possibly intended to say the same. 'Earlier' as you said may refer to a time/period prior to another, both being in the same range of period. Thus, though not obvious, the sense 'earlier than...another' (in the same year) becomes inherent there. Does it match with what we discussed...? – Ram Pillai Oct 13 at 7:32
  • @RamPillai Tank u a lot for the explanation. – M.omar Oct 18 at 5:33
  • @Jim Thank u a lot for your remark. – M.omar Oct 18 at 5:33

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