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I'm writing an informational essay that includes a description of an organization called Shepherd Community Center, and they say they work primarily in the "near Eastside of Indianapolis." I'd like to include this phrase in my essay, but their punctuation, capitalization, and/or spacing doesn't look right. What is the proper way to capitalize, punctuate, and space the phrase "near east side?"

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  • I'm not sure if this is valid to put in a comment, but although I have participated in the Stack Exchange network for over a year now, this is my first question.
    – Skylar
    Oct 5 '20 at 1:43
  • Using the techniques described in Xanne's answer, I determined the answer to my question to be "Near Eastside."
    – Skylar
    Oct 5 '20 at 3:26
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Names of places, including neighborhoods in cities, are often capitalized, according to the Chicago Manual of Style.

Thus Chicago has the Loop, the Near North side, the Magnificent Mile.

Your local newspapers probably have their own conventions for capitalization of parts of the city whose designations have become proper names, which you can discover by reading a few issues of the papers, especially the real estate sections.

If you’re writing for a local audience, following local conventions is a good idea. For a wider audience you may have to explain what the place name means.

This Wikipedia page https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Indianapolis_neighborhoods has a list of Indianapolis neighborhoods, but doesn’t include near Eastside.

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  • I don't live in Indianapolis; I live in a nearby city, so I don't see any newspapers from Indianapolis. A simple Google search unanimously "declares" the correct capitalization and spacing to be "Near Eastside," which still doesn't look right to me, but I'll go with it. Thank you!
    – Skylar
    Oct 5 '20 at 3:23
  • The Near Eastside is not a neighborhood, by the way. It is an area encompassing multiple neighborhoods.
    – Skylar
    Oct 5 '20 at 3:35

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