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I teach children aged 10 to 14.

I teach children ages 10 to 14.

marked as duplicate by Mari-Lou A, JJ for Transparency and Monica, J. Taylor, Rory Alsop, Bread May 20 '18 at 3:30

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  • Wonder if there should have been an of in the second sentence? Or a comma, perhaps? – Kris Jan 16 '12 at 9:08
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The first sentence is grammatical. The second one is not. You can change it with I teach children whose ages vary from 10 to 14.

EDIT upon comment: It seems I was mistaken in my initial answer and the second example is also grammatical. FumbleFingers' comment has the appropriate link to prove this.

  • I have found those two in a book published by MIT. It might be a typo then. – lukas Jan 15 '12 at 21:00
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    The second is not grammatical? Tell that to 821,000 published writers indexed in Google Books! – FumbleFingers Jan 15 '12 at 22:22
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    @FumbleFingers: In all honesty, I had never seen this before. I'd encountered "ages 10-15" (as an example), without the noun modifier preceding it. I'll edit my answer. Thank you. – Irene Jan 15 '12 at 22:32
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    @FumbleFingers: And the "ages 10-15" I'd seen was always isolated, i.e. in book covers or children's games, not part of a sentence, as in "Suitable for ages 10-15". – Irene Jan 15 '12 at 22:41
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    Since "ages 10 to 14" modifies "children", I'd like to see a comma there. – Ben Voigt Jan 16 '12 at 5:36

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