0

Was there any old usage of position indicating adjectives in English... like Potter stood in the "twoeth" place in the class or Rachel was in "foureth" place,.. to indicate rank /serial order /chronology ? From six onwards we have a regular rule to make such adjectives (like the Sixth amendment, Seventh day etc).

Likewise in the interrogative: In "what(eth)" block from street corner is the building you live in ?" .. had ever been in vogue?

In several other languages the rank indicative rule is followed without any exception.

1 Answer 1

2

Was there any old usage of position indicating adjectives in English... like Potter stood in the "twoeth" place in the class or Rachel was in "foureth" place,

No, first second and third were irregular but the rest are regular.

forma - first
ōðer - second (compare Modern English "other")
þridda - third

You seem to be confusing Old English (incomprehensible to Modern English speakers) and Middle English (difficult to understand for most Modern English speakers) with some invented version of English found in cheap novels.

"foureth" (fēorða (OE) - fourth) is completely wrong - "eth" was either "eth or "th" depending upon the previous sound. You should use the current version that does not have an "e" - fourth

Five was originally "fif" so "fifth" is also regular.

https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Old_English/Numbers

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.