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Could someone please tell me how to complete the second sentence so that it has a same meaning to the first one using the given word? You must use between three and six words including the word given.

  1. Your mobile phone should be switched off at all times during the performance.

world: should 2. Under no .... your mobile phone switched on during the performance.

Please note that you may not modify any part of the sentence apart from '...'. So 'Under no circumstances should your mobile phone be switched on during the performance' is incorrect.

I tried with: "circumstances should be" - but I think this is incorrect I don't have any other idea. Please help.

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  • It's not a pretty sentence, but: "Under no circumstances should you keep your mobile phone switched on during the performance." Sep 14 '20 at 15:04
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    @Yosef Baskin You spotted one ambiguity, but Am I allowed to turn it on for a few seconds every quarter of an hour, say? Sep 14 '20 at 15:16
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    'Switched off at all times' is unambiguous, but as Yosef shows, 'switched on' may be durative or punctive. (2') 'Under no circumstances should/may your mobile phone be on during the performance.' work. Sep 14 '20 at 15:20
  • @EdwinAshworth Astute point. Switched on seems to be the frozen part of the exercise, as is the given word should. How about "Under no circumstances, however brief, should you keep your mobile phone switched on during the performance"? Sep 14 '20 at 15:26
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    It's probably from a test, and as often/usual unmoderated for quality. The setter/s haven't picked up on the ambiguities blocked in the 'switched off at all times' but not in attempted rewrites using 'switched on'. The correct answer is to mark the question wrong. Sep 14 '20 at 16:34
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English does a strange thing where we put the noun inside the middle of the verb-phrase:

"Under no circumstances should your mobile phone be switched on during the performance."

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  • You cannot put 'be' after mobile phone. 'mobile phone switched on during the performance' can't be modified. So unfortunately this is not correct. Thanks anyway ;)
    – homar
    Sep 14 '20 at 19:49

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