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I would like to explain that I have been really slow with my work lately and I have yet to cover for few more remaining hours. Can someone tell me if I correctly managed to use lagging behind/falling behind/deficient in for this particular scenario? (I'm talking about the usage of grammar and phrase in this case)

I am lagging far behind my regular work schedule.

I have been repeatedly falling behind with my work.

I am falling behind rest of my colleagues.

Today I resulted in a work deficiency of 2 hours.

Today I was deficient in 2 hours at my work routine.

Please help me with the correction if possible. Thanks.

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I am lagging far behind my regular work schedule. [correct. You imagine yourself on a line of time, where you are finishing later than your planned times]

I have been repeatedly falling behind with my work. [correct. Perfect idiomatic usage of falling behind with, imaging yourself in some sort of race with your tasks, in which you keep falling behind them]

I am falling behind rest of my colleagues. [should be “... the rest of my colleagues”, indicating that you refer to the group of all your colleagues. If only some were ahead of you, say “... behind some of my colleagues”]

Deficiency is a shortage.

Today I resulted in a work deficiency of 2 hours. [I never heard this construction, which is at least confusing. A work deficiency sounds as if you did less work rather than late work. Most will consider this sentence wrong]

Today I was deficient in 2 hours at my work routine. [This too sounds as if you are trying to say you did less work rather than late work. Most people will not understand it. Most will consider it wrong]

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  • Instead of using 'deficient/deficiency', can I simply rephrase the whole thing like this: 1. Today I worked 2 hours less than required. 2. I have yet to cover for 2 more required hours from my last week's schedule. Sep 9, 2020 at 8:37
  • 1
    Yes. Those seem clear and understandable suggestions. :)
    – Anton
    Sep 9, 2020 at 12:49

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