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Consider two aqueous solutions:

  1. Solution 1

  2. Solution 2

Then note that:

  1. The temperature of the solution 1 is higher than that of the solution 2.

  2. The pressure of the solution 1 is lower than that of the solution 2.

Can I write the above two sentences in a sentence like the following:

"The temperature and pressure of the solution 1 are higher and lower than those of the solution 2"

How can I write the above sentences to sound more professional? Do you have any suggestions?

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I support the answer provided by @LBH. However, you should drop "the" in all instances of "the solution 1" and "the solution 2". This would give you:

The temperature and pressure of solution 1 are higher and lower, respectively, than those of solution 2.

I would also consider capitalizing all instances of "solution". This would give you:

The temperature and pressure of Solution 1 are higher and lower, respectively, than those of Solution 2.

Either of these possibilities would be perfectly acceptable in any scientific publication.

You could also consider this shorter alternative:

Solution 1 is at a higher temperature but lower pressure than Solution 2.

You could also use "and" instead of "but", but I would probably use "but" to emphasize the reversal of the inequality from higher (for temperature) to lower (for pressure).

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  • Why do you drop "the"? – MENG Sep 4 '20 at 14:22
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    Because using “the solution 1” implies there is more than one “solution 1”, and you’re referring to a specific one of those: “the” solution 1. The same logic applies to references to equations. One would never say “according to the Equation 1.” Like Solution 1”, Equation 1 says it all. Does that help? – Richard Kayser Sep 5 '20 at 0:57
  • Yes, Yes, You are right. thanks – MENG Sep 5 '20 at 4:58
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Yes, you can but usually you add a usual word, always the same, and this word is "respectively".

  • The temperature and pressure of the solution 1 are higher and lower(,) respectively(,) than those of the solution 2.

or

  • The temperature and pressure of the solution 1 are respectively higher and lower than those of the solution 2"
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The comparison is perfectly expressed. The english can be improved by omitting 'the' in each case, e.g. the pressure of solution 1, the temperature of solution 2.

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