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I was trying to say this in a sentence:

-I'm only available from Monday to Tuesday 2pm to 4pm. Please come during that time/during those times/in those time window.

But I feel I'm missing something. Which one is the proper way to say it?

I'm looking for a native/natural way to convey this. Context : Someone wants to meet me next week at my place but I'm only available on Monday and Tuesday and at 2pm to 4pm strictly. I would like to tell that person to please come only when I'm available at that specific time window. I had an idea of the sentence like above but I felt like it's inadequate or unnatural especially the <during that time/during those times/in those time window> part.

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Rather than emphasise that you are not available by using only, you could compose the message to concentrate only on the positive aspects - that you are available at some times. Also, try to avoid commanding them in any way by saying please come ....

On of the more neutral and positive ways might therefore be to say "I very much look forward to meeting. I am free 2-4 on both Monday and Tuesday. Either day suits me well, at your own convenience".

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  • Thanks for the answer. I realized that your approach is better in general. As a side question, if I want to be less courteous and more commanding in a way, what's the right phrase to use if I want to still go with the orginal sentence? <please come during that time/those times/in those time window>?
    – Aizen
    Commented Sep 3, 2020 at 21:13
  • Kind of you. Could you perhaps express a bit of regret first? "I regret that I am only free between 2 and 4 on both Monday and Tuesday so please choose which day suits you better."
    – Anton
    Commented Sep 3, 2020 at 21:29
  • Kind of you. Could you perhaps express a bit of regret first? "I regret that I am only free between 2 and 4 on both Monday and Tuesday so please choose which day suits you better."
    – Anton
    Commented Sep 3, 2020 at 21:29

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