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Is this sentence correct?

  • You will not be allowed to do neither the non-graded nor the graded assignment of week one unless you complete this activity.
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  • In order for us to know if this correctly represents what you want it to express, you will need to include an alternative description of what it is meant to mean. It's not all that clear what it means as it's currently written. Aug 19 '20 at 12:52
  • What I mean is that the students should do the activities otherwise they will not be allowed to do the assignments. Does it make sense now?
    – user396194
    Aug 19 '20 at 12:55
  • Welcome to ELU. You might take a look at this question and accepted answer: english.stackexchange.com/questions/39040/… .
    – rajah9
    Aug 19 '20 at 13:12
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    I am not used to seeing not with neither/nor. The neither and nor already have an implicit not. I might rephrase to: "Unless you complete this activity, you will be allowed to do neither the non-graded nor the graded assignment of week one."
    – rajah9
    Aug 19 '20 at 13:14
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    It should be "You will not be allowed to do either the non-graded or the graded assignment of week one unless you complete this activity."
    – Ram Pillai
    Aug 19 '20 at 13:57
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Technically, the sentence

You will not be allowed to do neither the non-graded nor the graded assignment of week one unless you complete this activity

could be considered correct as is, but it would have a rather unexpected meaning. It would mean: if you complete the activity, you'll be allowed to do neither the non-graded nor graded assignment; if you don't complete it, you will have to do at least one of them.

However, based on the obvious intended meaning (i.e. if you complete the activity, you'll be allowed to do one or both of the assignments; if you don't, you won't be allowed to do either of them), it should be either:

You will not be allowed to do either the non-graded or the graded assignment of week one unless you complete this activity

or

You will be allowed to do neither the non-graded nor the graded assignment of week one unless you complete this activity

Unless you want to sound very formal, the first of these two versions sounds better ("You will not be allowed to do either the non-graded or the graded assignment...").

In some dialects of English and in very colloquial usage, the original sentence could in fact express your intended meaning (cf "you ain't seen nothing yet") - but such usage would be considered non-standard and would be strenuously avoided in this kind of relatively formal context (the rules for assessment).

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