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  1. I need to talk to our lecturer tomorrow.
  2. I need to talk to our lecturer tomorrow.
  3. I need to talk to our lecturer tomorrow.
  4. I need to talk to our lecturer tomorrow.
  5. I need to talk to our lecturer tomorrow.

Please explain how the meaning of each sentence is changed by the emphasised words.

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  • Don't you think you'd find more suitable help at SE English Language Learners? If the Question belonged here, it would need you to first explain your own understanding of each choice… Aug 7 '20 at 0:03
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  1. I need to talk to our lecturer [as opposed to some other lecturer] tomorrow.
  2. I [not you] need to talk to our lecturer tomorrow.
  3. I need to talk [at length and not be quickly brushed off as in previous encounters] to our lecturer tomorrow.
  4. I need to talk to our lecturer tomorrow [as opposed to today].
  5. I need [my need is urgent] to talk to our lecturer tomorrow.
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  • Well put. Of course the "as opposed" details given for 3 and 4 are not the only possibilities, but just the fact that at least one possibility exists for each is enough to explain the emphasis.
    – nnnnnn
    Aug 5 '20 at 13:56
  • No. I need to talk to our lecturer [as opposed to some other lecturer] tomorrow. // I need to talk to our lecturer [as opposed to some other reasonable candidate] tomorrow. Aug 5 '20 at 14:40
  • A fine distinction, @EdwinAshworth, but a valid one.
    – RobJarvis
    Aug 6 '20 at 14:05

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