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Japan had a lower consumption of butter compared with Russia. Japan had a lower consumption of all butter compared with Russia.

  1. Do the two sentences above mean the same? please explain

Japan had a lower consumption of salted butter compared with Russia. Japan had a lower consumption of butter compared with Russia.

  1. Do the word salted butter can be replaced into butter? please explain

I would really appreciate for every comment! Thank you so much!!

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    You do realise that some butter is salted, and some isn't? The word "butter" on its own might mean "salted butter", "unsalted butter", or "all butter" in any given context. Come to that, it might mean "yak butter" or similar, rather than butter made from cows' milk. – FumbleFingers Aug 1 at 13:49
  • I have a conflict with my colleagues about writing a conclusion. They said: This sentence "Japan had a lower consumption of butter compared with Russia." means "Japan had a lower consumption of all butter compared with Russia." and your data only shows Japan had a lower consumption of salted butter,clarified butter, and european butter – Martin Aug 1 at 14:03
  • “Japan consumes less butter than Russia.” The butters are in truth whatever the respective countries count. Also it’s not clear whether this is the whole country or per capita, which makes a big difference if you’re drawing health implications. – Xanne Aug 1 at 17:51
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There is a good example of adding qualifiers:

Two shops were in competition in a street. The owner of shop A put up a sign “CHEAPEST IN THE STREET!” Shop B then put up a sign “CHEAPEST IN THE TOWN!” So A changed his sign to “CHEAPEST IN THE COUNTRY!” And B’s response was “CHEAPEST IN THE WORLD!” A replied with “CHEAPEST IN THE UNIVERSE!” B thought for a while, and put up a sign “CHEAPEST!”

Adjectival modifiers restrict or are emphatic. In your example “butter” is an uncountable noun and its meaning encompasses all those things which have the quality of “butter” regardless of any other attribute (including “salted”)– all is basically an emphatic and unnecessary – omit it.

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  • Thanks a lot for your response!! Does it mean this sentence "Japan had a lower consumption of salted butter,clarified butter, and european butter compared with Russia" can be replaced into "Japan had a lower consumption of butter compared with Russia."? – Martin Aug 1 at 14:43
  • No. Salted, clarified, and European are all modifiers that restrict the type of butters involved to those types that are mentioned. In "Japan had a lower consumption of butter ..", Butter" = every possible type of butter. – Greybeard Aug 1 at 14:49
  • If butter = all butter, does it mean I can replace jewellery to all jewellery in this sentence "Police launch appeal after thieves steal jewellery from north-east home" to "Police launch appeal after thieves steal all jewellery from north-east home" link – Martin Aug 1 at 15:53
  • No. In the first place, the link goes to a headline and headlines have their own grammar which differs from "normal" grammar. In the first example, "jewellery" is an indefinite amount of jewellery; in the second "all jewellery" = all of the jewellery, or it could mean "the only place from which all thieves steal jewellery is a home in the north east of the city.".. – Greybeard Aug 1 at 16:18
  • Then, this link goes to a maintext. Does it mean that now I can change this sentence The 72-year-old woman had money stolen from her bank account following the incident in Brownhill Drive, Newmachar, at around 2.30pm on Thursday afternoon. to The 72-year-old woman had all of the money stolen from her bank account following the incident in Brownhill Drive, Newmachar, at around 2.30pm on Thursday afternoon. because money = all of the money (butter = all of the butter)? source: [link] (news.stv.tv/north/…) – Martin Aug 2 at 2:04

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