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The Collins English Usage reads

Don't use ‘of’ after ‘no one’ or ‘nobody’; Say ‘None of the children could speak French’.

However in the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language on can find : No one of these properties is unique

Is this just stylistic advice? no single one of seems to accept better plural noun phrases .

When none is modified by almost, it is difficult to avoid treating the word as a plural: Almost none of the officials were interviewed by the committee.

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  • I've personally never heard the usage of "No one of [plural]," and it sounds off to me. However, "Not one of [plural]" sounds fine to me and I have indeed heard it before. A link to the Cambridge example would be useful.
    – Tyler N
    Jul 27, 2020 at 12:44
  • @TylerN no single one of the traditional scientific disciplines could lay a dominant claim on Allen's interests. (Google books)
    – GJC
    Jul 27, 2020 at 13:31
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    This is the second time you've quoted a source and not provided the exact text. Collins actually says the following: "Don't use ‘of’ after ‘no one’ or ‘nobody’. Don't say, for example, ‘No one of the children could speak French’. Say ‘None of the children could speak." Jul 27, 2020 at 22:19
  • As it stands, you have plagiarized the source by leaving out information that's essential to its original meaning. Jul 27, 2020 at 22:20
  • @JasonBassford Unlike the plural are, the singular Is any of the children coming? implies one is expected, with uncertainty as to which (American Heritage dictionary)
    – GJC
    Jul 27, 2020 at 22:37

1 Answer 1

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Not exactly, but to understand why and how you need to look at the full Cambridge sentence, which, if my research is correct, is "No one of these properties is unique to adjectives, but only adjectives possess all four."

In that version of the sentence, "one" is setting up a contrast with "all four." In other words, while there is no single one of the properties is unique to adjectives, the set of properties taken all together ARE unique to adjectives.

Similarly, if the Collins sentence set up the children one by one in contrast with the children all together, "no one" would be appropriate: "No one of the the children could speak French fluently, but among them they knew enough scraps to piece together what the letter meant."

Without the second half, the Cambridge sentence "No one of these properties is unique" reads very strangely to me.

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  • Garner's fourth edition reads No one of the candidates succeeded in completely marshaling his cohorts before the first ballot / To the legion of the lost ones, to the cohort of the damned
    – GJC
    Jul 27, 2020 at 13:22
  • Unlike the plural are, the singular Is any of the children coming? implies one is expected, with uncertainty as to which (American Heritage dictionary)
    – GJC
    Jul 27, 2020 at 22:38
  • Yes; 'no one of ...' means 'no single-membered subset of [ξ]'. No [single] one of these precautions will be sufficient to eradicate the virus.' Whereas 'not one of' means 'no member of ξ'. 'Not one of these restrictions should be relaxed.' Jul 28, 2020 at 15:07
  • @EdwinAshworth Page 164 of Practical English Usage reads : No one (also written no-one in British English) means the same as nobody. It cannot be followed by of: No one wished me a happy birthday, (not No one of my friends. . .)
    – GJC
    Jul 29, 2020 at 18:51
  • @GJC Grammars are not inerrant. No two of them agree completely. And no one of them is sufficient to cover all points. // 'As management expert Ken Blanchard says: “No one of us is as smart as all of us”!' [OpenHorizons] Jul 29, 2020 at 19:20

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