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What is/are the difference(s) between the two sentences? Is it just the number of problems, or do they mean something different other than the number of problems?

  1. I don't want to be involved in the problems of my boss.
  2. I don't want to be involved in the problem of my boss.

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1 implies that the boss has problems of his own that you do not want to be involved in.

2 is more ambiguous. It probably means that your boss is himself or herself a problem of some sort (bad manager, incompetent etc).

2 is less likely to mean that your boss has only one problem and that you do not want to be involved in it. This meaning would normally be expressed by something like “I do not want to be involved in my boss's problem”

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  • Thanks. The difference you explained is exactly what I wanted to know. Differentiation of "A's B" from "B of A" is not easy for non-native speakers of English. What I want to know next are: 1) how come is the second example less likely to mean that my boss has only one problem? and 2) Why is "my boss's problem" more appropriate to mean that my boss has only one problem? It's really puzzling.
    – Takashi
    Commented Jul 25, 2020 at 7:59

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