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I am still confused with the classifications of such nouns as area, spot, compound (which refers to a type of area), and area itself. Are they abstract or concrete nouns?

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    Does this answer your question? Is there an English dictionary that distinguishes words as either abstract or concrete? The best answer here is that the terms 'concrete' and 'abstract' are often considered archaic (at least) nowadays, and more sound analysis rejects a clear dichotomy here. Jul 24, 2020 at 11:52
  • Oh yeah. Thanks. I've been searching for such a dictionary. Jul 24, 2020 at 11:54
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    Note that usages, not nouns, need to be considered. 'Corner' is used very differently in 'The corner of the box is damaged' and 'Messi has scored from a corner'. As is 'fields' in 'These fields have been sown with wheat' and 'Psychiatry and psychology are, of course, closely related fields'. Jul 24, 2020 at 11:57
  • Now, what if it were the school compound is always clean. Would it be an abstract noun there? Jul 24, 2020 at 12:07
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    It depends on your chosen definition of 'compound' (does it include shrubs, air space ...?) and your chosen psycholinguistic analyst who still persists with a simplistic notion of 'abstractness'. I suggest you read Professor Lawler's wisdom at the Is recipe an abstract noun? thread. There is a thread somewhere mentioning a more satisfactory classification than the crude concrete v abstract attempt. Jul 24, 2020 at 14:30

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