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During the lecture, I've missheard one word of the sentence below. Somehow, I've got the feeling the missing word should be part of a common phrase that I've already come across but I just can't put my finger on it. I''ve marked the phrase I'm talking about and replaced the missing word with the set of other words (the ones in capitals) to make the context clear.

At the end of the Georgian era, there is

a new GROUP OF PEOPLE on the market

-the lower classes- who didn't possess so much money, but still wanted to have their houses nicely equipped.

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In both business and sociology, a particular word used for this is demographic:

[Merriam-Webster]
1 demographics plural : the statistical characteristics of human populations (such as age or income) used especially to identify markets
   // a change in the state's demographics
2 business : a market or segment of the population identified by demographics
   // trying to reach a younger demographic

Used in the example sentence, it would become the following:

At the end of the Georgian era, there is a new demographic on the market—the lower classes—who didn't possess so much money, but still wanted to have their houses nicely equipped.


In sociology, it's used as an adjective. The remainder of the dictionary definition uses such phrases as demographic trends and demographic shift.

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