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I am unable to grasp the meaning of the statement -

But unlike curly brackets, you may actually encounter them when reading outside of those disciplines, although not with any type of frequency.

context -

Angle Brackets

Also known as chevrons, these types of brackets frequently appear in mathematics and quantum physics. But unlike curly brackets, you may actually encounter them when reading outside of those disciplines, although not with any type of frequency. Angle brackets may occur in linguistics. For example:

      The English word /kæt/ is spelled ⟨cat⟩.

Sometimes, although not often, angle brackets are used to indicate internal thought. For example:

      Todd handed me a flower. "Smell it."
      I took a sniff. "It's nice." <What a disgusting stench!>

Angle brackets are used frequently in comic books to denote someone speaking in another language. Double angle brackets are sometimes used in lieu of quotation marks. They are also used in computer-mediated communication to indicate an action or status. For example:

      <<waves>>
      <<offline>>

Reference article -

https://www.scribendi.com/academy/articles/square_brackets_curly_brackets_angle_brackets.en.html

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    What is it that is giving you trouble? It seems straightforward to me (except the rather unusual phrase any type of frequency, which would be more normally any frequency), so I don't know where your problem is. – Colin Fine Jul 21 '20 at 16:40
  • @ColinFine: I would go further: any type of frequency is a disfluency, not just an unusual turn of phrase. It suggests to me that the writer is incompetent. – TonyK Jul 21 '20 at 22:53
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But unlike curly brackets, you may encounter them [Angled Brackets] when reading outside those disciplines [the sciences where they are frequently used], although not with any type of frequency.

<, >

angled brackets occur frequently in mathematics, quantum mechanics, and are used similar to curly brackets in English in Russian.

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