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First of all, I am not a native English speaker, so sorry if this question seems very basic for some of you.

Among the following two quotes, which grammar would make more sense, and why:

1- original:

"Respect the old when you are young. Help the weak when you are strong. confess the fault when you are Wrong. Because one day in life you will be old, weak and wrong."

2- my correction:

"Respect the old when you are young. Help the weak when you are strong. confess the Fault when you are Wrong. Because one day in life you will be old, weak and wronged."

The quote has three main parts:

1- Respect the old when you are young because one day in life you will be old (so you want others to respect you)

2- Help the weak when you are strong because onde day in life you will be weak. (so you want others to help you)

3- Confess the fault when you are wrong because one day in life you will be (wrong/wronged). (so you want others to confess their fault)

For some reason, I feel using 'wronged' instead of 'wrong' makes more sense?

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    The first: consistency. – Bitter dreggs. Jul 18 '20 at 21:09
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    To be wrong and to be wronged are not the same. – Xanne Jul 18 '20 at 23:19
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    Your "correction" has changed the meaning, not because of grammar but because wronged does not mean the same thing as wrong. – nnnnnn Jul 18 '20 at 23:28
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    Thanks all! I know that wrong and wronged are different things. WRONG = to wrong someone or be incorrect. where WRONGED = someone has done you wrong. The quote has three main parts: 1- Respect the old when you are young because one day in life you will be old 2- help the weak when you are strong because onde day in life you will be weak. 3- confess the fault when you are wrong because one day in life you will be (wrong/wronged). For some reason, I feel using wronged make more sense? – Sulaiman Alessa Jul 19 '20 at 0:14
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    You won't be young anymore. You won't be strong anymore. But you will still be wrong, at least some of the time. – Peter Jul 19 '20 at 2:43
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Your question comes down to the difference between two statements (advice).

  1. Confess the fault when you are wrong because one day in life you will be wrong.

  2. Confess the fault when you are wronged, because one day in life you will be wronged.

In statement #1, the main clause asks that you admit to being wrong, but then posits a future in which you will be wrong. But in both cases you are wrong, so where is the ethical wisdom?

In statement #2, you are asked to lie about being wronged, because in the future you will be wronged again. The logic escapes me.

Now, Confess the fault when you are wrong because one day you will be wronged (someone will resist admitting they are wrong in actions toward you) makes more ethical sense because your admission models the universal expectation, act as all should act: Kant.

  • Thanks @Zan700 for sharing your thought, so do you think using the word 'wronged' instead of 'wrong' is a better choice? – Sulaiman Alessa Jul 20 '20 at 8:20

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