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I need to summarize an interview for a news article across a few sentences in a single paragraph that uses a series of paraphrased remarks.

Specifically, I'm looking for examples of clean ways to make it clear that the entire paragraph is a summary of what the source said, not the journalists ideas. I'd like to avoid adding phrases to every sentence such as"she said," "they added," or "according to Joe."

Here's an example full of attributions to show the awkwardness I'm looking to avoid.

According to Dave Thomas, the Whopper is a great sandwich. It has lettuce, tomato, and even mayonnaise, he added. Mr. Thomas said that it's flame broiled, which means it's cooked over an open flame. The bun is topped with sesame seeds, which add a nice crunch, according to Mr. Thomas. He finally finished by explaining how difficult it will be to attribute all of these juicy factoids.

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  • It's not entirely clear what you mean. Please provide more clarity, with some simple examples. So long as you don't provide direct quotations, it's fine to paraphrase along with attribution. Commented Jul 16, 2020 at 21:49
  • You have to say something like X said that [whatever, without quotes], according to X [whatever], or to paraphrase X, and then say what you want to say, and also provide a citation. But you can paraphrase everything you need in the entire paragraph, borrowing from difference sources within the same source, providing a citation only at the end. Commented Jul 18, 2020 at 2:03
  • So are you saying that in my real-life example citing my exclusive interview with the founder of Wendy's, I could write: "According to Dave Thomas, the Whopper is a great sandwich. It has lettuce, tomato, and even mayonnaise. It's flame broiled, which means it's cooked over an open flame. The bun is topped with sesame seeds, which add a nice crunch. He finally finished by explaining how difficult it will be to attribute all of these juicy factoids." You're right, now that I've typed it out, it's quite evident that these are all his ideas. If you want to write an answer I'll accept. Commented Jul 18, 2020 at 21:38
  • Yes, exactly. So long what you summarize or paraphrase is accurate, then there's no problem with condensing all of the information into a shorter version without actual quotations. You would also need to use a footnote or endnote at some point that references the specific details (time and place, and so on) of the information. Commented Jul 18, 2020 at 22:44
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The awkwardly worded example could be re-written as follows, where it's still evident that these are all Dave Thomas's ideas.

According to Dave Thomas, the Whopper is a great sandwich. It has lettuce, tomato, and even mayonnaise. It's flame broiled, which means it's cooked over an open flame. The bun is topped with sesame seeds, which add a nice crunch. He concluded by explaining how difficult it will be to attribute all of these juicy factoids."

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  • Why the downvote? Commented Jul 20, 2020 at 20:04

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