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American workers facing a less prosperous future than their parents’ generation have gotten the message—or at least a version of it.

Can anyone please explain the structure? Is there any implied be verb after workers, like workers are facing?

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[American workers facing a less prosperous future than their parents’ generation] have gotten the message.

No: the bracketed element is a non-finite clause functioning as subject of the sentence. It's quite common for non-finite clauses, as well as finite ones, to function as subject.

Within that clause the gerund-participial clause "facing a less prosperous future than their parents’ generation" is modifying "American workers".

In your example the gerund-participial clause is the semantic equivalent of the relative clause in American workers who are facing a less prosperous future than their parents’ generation.

But it's not called a relative clause since there is no possibility of it containing a relative phrase (cf. *American workers who facing a less prosperous future than their parents’ generation).

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American workers facing a less prosperous future than their parents’ generation have gotten the message

"facing a less prosperous future than their parents’ generation" is what is known as a reduced relative clause.

In full, it is

American workers who are facing a less prosperous future than their parents’ generation have gotten the message.

("American workers are facing a less prosperous future than their parents’ generation have gotten the message." is wrong for obvious reasons.)

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  • Greybeard thanks a lot. Jul 11 '20 at 9:29
  • Don't you think this question suits English Language Learners site better? It's interesting that you kindly left answer for this. I have no clue what your criteria is
    – user88310
    Jul 12 '20 at 12:47

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