2

This pluralization pattern is highly unlike those I found in English, such as those ending in -(e)s and ones that were technically borrowed from Latin and Greek, thus following different patterns that may confuse English speakers themselves.

  • 3
    See also Cherubim, Hasidim, and goyim. Same suffix, Hebrew masculine plural. – John Lawler Jun 26 at 23:11
8

That is because seraph derives from Hebrew, and the plural male form in Hebrew ends with the syllable "im".

etymonline.com -

seraph (n.) 1667, first used by Milton (probably on analogy of cherub/cherubim), back-formed singular from Old English seraphim (plural), from Late Latin seraphim, from Greek seraphim, from Hebrew seraphim

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4

Seraph is actually a back formation of seraphim, first used by British author Milton:

1667, first used by Milton (probably on analogy of cherub/cherubim), back-formed singular from Old English seraphim (plural), from Late Latin seraphim, from Greek seraphim, from Hebrew seraphim (only in Isaiah vi), *plural of saraph (which does not occur in the Bible), probably literally "the burning one," from saraph "it burned." Seraphs were traditionally regarded as burning or flaming angels, though the word seems to have some etymological sense of "flying," perhaps from confusion with the root of Arabic sharafa "be lofty." Some scholars identify it with a word found in other passages interpreted as "fiery flying serpent."

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  • 5
    Just because a word doesn't occur in the Bible, it doesn't mean it's not a valid Hebrew word. – Peter Shor Jun 26 at 22:54

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