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I came accross sentences like these:

"blablabla" says a breathless Mrs Johnson.

"Dinosaur Jr. set to release new album mid-2016, says a nervous Lou Barlow"

Are breathless and nervous an attribute of Mrs Johnson and Lou Barlow in the sentences below, or there is a grammatical construction "a/an + adjective" and two examples of this construction are to see in these sentences? Can I understand these sentences, as if they were:

Mrs Johnson says breathlessly "blablabla"

Lou Barlow says nervously "Dinosaur Jr. set to release new album mid-2016"

Or can I say: "He says a proud, >>I did it!<<"?

If this construction exists, where can I find a reference of it?

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    It does exist, especially in journalistic prose; it's one way to cram a lot of information into an opening paragraph or headline. But only in print; and only in some kinds of print at that. Nobody would ever talk this way. In the example, breathless and nervous are temporary attributes of the human agent at the time, place, and circumstances of the action performed. Note, by the way, that all the verbs involved are speech verbs; adding some human emotional description is common practice with otherwise dull press releases. – John Lawler Jun 11 '20 at 15:42
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    It's an interesting construction. I guess the use of "a" is to avoid the implication of a nickname/an epithetical connotation/characterising the person themselves with the adjective - where "...says breathless Mrs Johnson" could be interpreted as equivalent to stating "...says Breathless Mrs Johnson". It may be found in ordinary verbal speech, for example when retelling events to an audience, for example "we heard a loud bang, and a disheveled Mr Smith then burst into our room". – Steve Jun 11 '20 at 17:03
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    @JohnLawler, thank you for this comment, it contains what I wanted to know, my question was not that exact though. – Édes István Gergely Jun 11 '20 at 17:12
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    @Steve, thank you too, I think, it helps me to get a context of this construction. – Édes István Gergely Jun 11 '20 at 17:17
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    I remember a paper by Jerry Morgan in a CLS volume from the 1970s or so, that contrasted phrases like a sullen and snappish Henry Kissinger and the sullen and snappish Henry Kissinger. – John Lawler Jun 11 '20 at 18:18
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Mrs Johnson and Lou Barlow have various aspects to their character. Sometimes they are happy - sometimes they are a happy Mrs Johnson and a happy Lou Barlow. Sometimes they are thoughtful - sometimes they are a thoughtful Mrs Johnson and a thoughtful Lou Barlow.

If you bear in mind that "a/an [noun]" gives the meaning of a/an/one example or instance of a [noun] - a cat = one example of a cat - and "a/an [proper noun]" will mean "a/an/one example or instance of [proper noun]" - an example of the Eiffel Tower - you will see that "a/an [adjective] + [proper noun] gives

A nervous America awaited the results = "an example or instance of a nervous America...," which we can restate idiomatically as "An example of America when it was nervous ..."

Thus "blablabla" says a breathless Mrs Johnson. = "blablabla" says and example of Mrs Johnson when she was breathless.

"Dinosaur Jr. set to release new album mid-2016, says a nervous Lou Barlow" = "Dinosaur Jr. set to release new album mid-2016, says an example of Lou Barlow when he was nervous."

Can I understand these sentences, as if they were:

Mrs Johnson says breathlessly "blablabla"

Lou Barlow says nervously "Dinosaur Jr. set to release new album mid-2016"

No. There is no adverbial function in breathless or nervous - there is no information about how anything was said. There is only information about the subject's state at the time of saying it:

Consider:

""I will kill the dragon" said an unhappy Sir Greybeard in a timid voice." Sir Greybeard is unhappy but speaks timidly, not sadly.

"I will kill the dragon said Sir Greybeard bravely, although he was a coward and intended to run away." He said it bravely but he was not brave.

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